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The Abnormal Psychology of Crimes and Their Consequences From a Biblical Perspective

Why Black Lives Do Matter

· Black Lives Matter,Slavery In America,Abnormal Psychology,Biblical Ethics,Drug Crime Offenses

EXPLORING THE ABNORMAL PSYCHOLOGY OF CRIME, AND ITS CONSEQUENCES INVOLVES UNDERSTANDING HOW OUR NATION BEGAN: 1. CLAIMING LAND THAT WAS INHABITED BY OTHERS, AND 2. BUILDING A NATION ON THE BACKS OF SLAVES

Sub-topic: A possible way to deal with minor drug offenses that might be more effective than jail terms.

Let’s get the cause out of the way, for in order to propose the accurate measure of dealing or attempting to eradicate drug offenses more effectively, and to avoid stronger prison terms, we must state that, (According to McQuilkin and Copan in An Introduction to Biblical Ethics: Walking In the Way of Wisdom): “Blaming society means abdicating personal responsibility for the direction of one’s life. And this refusal to own up to one’s wrongdoing shuts the door to the possibility of salvation by God’s grace. The Bible is much more realistic (see part three, “Sin”). It both recognizes the influence of environment (“the world”) and thus the responsibility of people to create as good an environment as possible for others as well as for themselves. It also recognizes the role of responsible choice. Our path to the proper solution for crime means each person taking responsibility for his own actions. Crime’s root is sin, and the final responsibility for crime rests with the sinner. Lack of discipline or love in the home, failure of justice in society, evil companions and poor education all may contribute, but in the final analysis, we sin because we are sinners and choose to sin—and thus contribute to the deterioration of our character.” [1]

What the author goes on to say is a profound statement which gives insight into the family dynamics and the mindset of criminals, is this “we believe the breakdown of the family is the leading negative environmental influence.” [2] While I can agree with this statement, I feel the author fails to go deeper and explore the causes of the breakdown for the marginally accused offenders. For example, the often racially profiled “blacks” or “African Americans” whom the author and other people in leadership and including evangelicals often allude to contributing largely to a greater percentage crime in the U.S., are not truly given a fair assessment on this topic. With the breakdown of the family being said to be the leading cause of negative environmental influence, perhaps we should look at “slavery in America" as the defining moment that changed the landscape for the nature of most crimes. Not that sin isn’t the main cause as we all know, but that the “sin” against our fellow man goes unnoticed, and most importantly unpunishable.

I (Crystal Elizabeth Melville) often say to my own children, because we “black people” have been seen as less than, and subsequently treated as animals ( and most people love animals) because of our race, we must not repay evil for evil, because that would make us like our oppressor, and thus we would defame God’s character as professed Christians and also become like someone or a some people who choose to be ruled by pride, ignorance, lacking compassion, and moral fortitude. I also teach that we must test the ‘spirits’ of all people, for not all people think the same.

I (Crystal Elizabeth Melville) would go on record to say that before we propose a way to treat criminals committing the crime of drug abuse and the act of selling drugs, we would have to start in the home. We have to somehow, explain to our children why someone would c

I (Crystal Elizabeth Melville) often say to my own children, because we “black people” have been seen as less than, and subsequently treated as animals ( and most people love animals) because of our race, we must not repay evil for evil, because that would make us like our oppressor, and thus we would defame God’s character as professed Christians and also become like someone or a some people who choose to be ruled by pride, ignorance, lacking compassion, and moral fortitude. I also teach that we must test the ‘spirits’ of all people, for not all people think the same.

I (Crystal Elizabeth Melville), would go on record to say that before we propose a way to treat criminals committing the crime of drug abuse and the act of selling drugs, we would have to start in the home. We have to somehow, explain to our children why someone would Choose to sell drugs to support their family, and take drugs to mask the pain due to the absence of family, and that this choice is not going to make the problem go away. As Christians we are to teach the importance of living like Christ, forgiving our enemies or those who treat us less than the dust we walk on, that they are not keeping the same commandments they claim to uphold. Likewise, for a “black” person to sell drugs to another “black” person or person in another minority groups for example, Hispanics and Mexicans, this only shows that we have no idea how we are truly upholding evil in God’s eyes and in the eyes of the impressionable youth and our parents (ancestors), who have endured such suffering.

We have to see that the pain continues because we choose sin over true redemption in Christ. The mental health agenda long rooted in pain, trauma and suffering began with a choice, the choice to disobey God (Gen. 3.), since the Fall, we all have displeased God to say the least and what we fail to realize is that we sin against God, so how can we call ourselves Christians? This is a personal question, and needs to be answered in person, quietly, and with no need for agreement or affiliation to any group. We have to face God alone.

For instance, if we want to propose shorter jail terms, which I don’t think that will end the war on drugs; we have to propose that more Christians be upstanding and be not only a sayer of the word but a doer of it. If depraved people due to the breakdown of the home, continue to think that abusing and selling drugs is the only way to one up the system then we can’t win this war. Thus, the only way is for God’s people, a people called by His name, stand up, put down the idols, and speak the truth! We have to speak to the drug dealers, even those in high places, and say, listen, your own children are at risk! Your legacy is at risk. What will you say to God on that day of judgment? Yes, all of the programs are nice, and they have helped some, but the other half think it is the drugs or bust. So, we have big problems and few morally competent leaders and laborers to fight the good fight. It is up to us to do our part, then and only then, we will have lesser sentences to refute.

Consequently, the American Psychological Association wrote an article and gave Alternatives to incarceration: Drug and mental health courts give certain offenders what they really need: treatment. Read here: https://www.apa.org/monitor/julaug03/alternatives.

“The Nova Recovery Center” in Houston, Texas, who propose:

Rethinking Prison for Drug Offenders: Alternatives to Incarceration. Read here: https://novarecoverycenter.com/addiction/rethinking-prison-for-drug-offenders-alternatives-to-incarceration-2/

In a nutshell, there are many resources and causes that support the need to dig deeper and realize that the overpopulated prisons and the parole system are not doing a very good job of rehabilitating drug offenders. Why? It is a sin problem of pride and idolatry rooted in life issues: racism, classism, and violent crimes which altogether only do one thing, they separate us from God’s presence and His love. Though God looks down with anger, and disappoint He is still on the throne and is seeking his diligent servants to answer the call. We (students) at Liberty University, and other Christian Seminaries and Institutions are being trained and dispatched in all areas of life, at home, at work, at school and in our communities. Will we answer the call? I (Crystal Elizabeth Melville) will. With the help, and power of the Holy Spirit, I desire to lead with wisdom, compassion, and speak the truth at all costs. What about you?

 

[1] McQuilkin, Robertson. An Introduction to Biblical Ethics: Walking in the Way of Wisdom. (2017), p. 431. Retrieved from https://app.wordsearchbible.lifeway.com

[2] Ibid.

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